Event Information

   Luciana da Silva Samba Dancer  |   Social Dancing


Luciana da Silva, native from Brazil, is a Brazilian dance teacher and performing artist. She has been teaching Brazilian dance in the U.S. for over a decade and is the producer of an annual show in Colorado called Viva Brasil! Luciana has a deep understanding of various Brazilian dance genres and related music styles through her continuous training with some of the best known master dance teachers in Brazil. She also regularly attends the carnival in Brazil to stay up to date on the latest trends found among the best samba schools in Rio. Luciana has bee an important representative of Brazilian culture in Colorado. Currently, she resides in Boulder and teaches Samba and Forro in Boulder and Denver.

Luciana da Silva, native from Brazil, is a Brazilian dance teacher and performing artist. She has been teaching Brazilian dance in the U.S. for over a decade and is the producer of an annual show in


BDC Member: 
Yes


Contact: 
Luciana da Silva
 
(719)-200-6054
 


Website: 


All events, both regular and special, for this group follow below:

Regular Event: Forro (Brazilian couples dance) - Forro (Brazilian couples dance) Lesson

When:
Every Saturday of the Month

Time:  
11:00am-12:30pm


Where:
The Avalon, North Lobby
 
6185 Arapahoe Rd
 
Boulder CO 80303
 


Cost: 
15.00 no partner necessary


More Information:


Contact: 
Luciana da Silva
(719)-200-6054



Description

Forró is the Brazilian, now very much international, hip-swivelling, dance floor-filling, popular music and dance originated in Brazil’s north-eastern states. As some forrozeiros (fans of forró) would put it, “it’s less competitive than salsa and less technical than tango…”. It is arguably one of the easier partner dances to master, which would explain why it’s so addictive and increasingly popular! Oh, and by the way – it’s pronouced “faw-HAW”…

 

In the traditional style, partners are usually in close embrace and move sideways without any spins or arms movements. However in the recent past a more modern dance style emerged – by incorporating moves from other partner dances, it made forró more modern and attractive. It first became popular with the young crowds in cities like São Paulo, and then more surprisingly spread abroad and especially in Europe. There are many debates and arguments on what constitues each style: forró pé-de-serra and arrastape more focused on legwork, forró universitario more focused on spins and technique, and so on